Send

(484) 383-3900

It's time to get them out of public school. James Dobson - Focus on the Family

Kingdom Education is God's 1st Choice!

In Christ are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge Col. 3:23

Student Login Parent Login
Student Log In
Parent Log In

Southern Baptist parents across the country are forming an exodus from the public school system. They are reclaiming our children for the cause of Christ. The public school system has betrayed us. It's time to take matters into our own hands. Mimi Rothschild
Founder & Education Expert

Learning By Grace, Inc. on Facebook

PREMIERE CHRISTIAN ONLINE HOMESCHOOLING PRORGAM

  • No more teaching alone with our Online Homeschooling Program
  • Accredited Christian Homeschooling Online Program
  • Multimedia-rich, interactive, Christian Homeschool curriculum

YOU GET:

  • 1:1 Live Tutoring
  • 180 Lessons
  • Tests & Projects
  • Teacher Grading
  • Books, Videos, & CDs
  • Biblical & Safe
  • Affordable

Kingdom Education News

Christian Homeschooling Online Resources Nationally Accredited Online School
Brochure Christian Home School

Christian Homeschooling Online Newsletter

Subscribe

Join Christian Homeschool

FREE subscription to our Christian Homeschooling Online Newsletter filled with engaging videos, tips, quotes and encouragement.

Curriculum for Homeschooling Families

Call Today for Christian Homeschool Help(484) 383-3900

ATTENTION: Southern Baptist Leaders, Churches, & Schools! Would You Like To Become An Exodus Partner?

The Southern Baptist Academy can help you expand your current services with our Christian Homeschool Program. Find out more >

E-mail This Page To A Friend

Today's public schools are rapidly sprinting towards moral relativism and spiritual confusion. Parents who send their kids to these institutions every day run the risk of having their precious children indoctrinated against the very Christian values they hold dear. Southern Baptist leaders are calling for an alternative. This is that alternative Mimi Rothschild, Founder & Christian HomeSchool Advocate



Questions Before, During, and After Reading: Part 2 of 2


Mimi Rothschild
Thursday, 15 November 2007 10:18

Comments Off

 

By Mimi Rothschild

 

Here’s part two of “Questions Before, During, and After Reading.”  I’d love to hear your thoughts on it!

How Can You Stretch Students’ Thinking?

 

The best way to stretch students’ thinking about a text is to help them ask increasingly challenging questions. Some of the most challenging questions are “Why?” questions about the author’s intentions and the design of the text. For example:

 

“Why do you think the author chose this particular setting?”
“Why do you think the author ended the story in this way?”
“Why do you think the author chose to tell the story from the point of view of the daughter?”
“What does the author seem to be assuming about the reader’s political beliefs?”

 

Another way to challenge readers is to ask them open-ended question that require evidence from the text to answer. For example:

 

“What does Huck think about girls? What is your evidence?”
“Which character in the story is most unlike Anna? Explain your reasons, based on evidence from the novel?”
“What is the author’s opinion about affirmative action in higher education? How do you know?”

 

Be sure to explicitly model your own challenging questions while reading aloud a variety of texts, including novels, subject-area textbooks, articles, and nonfiction. Help students see that answering challenging questions can help them understand text at a deeper level, ultimately making reading a more enjoyable and valuable experience.

 

As students become proficient in generating challenging questions, have them group the questions the time they were asked (before, during or after reading). Students can determine their own categories, justify their reasons for placing questions into the categories, and determine how this can help their reading comprehension.

 

When Can You Use It?

 

Reading/English

 

Students who have similar interests can read the same text and meet to discuss their thoughts in a book club. Members can be given a set of sticky notes to mark questions they have before, during, and after reading the text. Members can then share their question with one another to clarify understanding within their group. Since students’ reading level may not necessarily determine which book club they choose to join, accommodations may need to be made, including buddy reading, audio recordings of the text, or the use of computer-aided reading systems.

 

Writing

 

Good writers anticipate their readers’ questions. Have students jot down the questions they will attempt to answer in an essay or short story before they write it, in the order that they plan to answer them. Stress that this should not be a mechanical process – as students write they probably will think of additional questions to ask and answer. The key point is to have students think of themselves as having a conversation with the reader – and a big part of this is knowing what questions the reader is likely to ask.

 

Math

 

Students can ask questions before, during, and after solving a math problem. Have students think aloud or write in groups to generate questions to complete performance tasks related to mathematics.

 

Social Studies

 

Use before, during, and after questions when beginning a new chapter or unit of study in any social studies topic. Select a piece of text, and have students generate questions related to the topic. At the end of the unit of study, refer back to the questions and discuss how the questions helped students to understand the content.

 

Science

 

Use before, during, and after questions to review an article or science text. You can discuss articles related to a recent scientific discovery with students and then generate questions that would help them to focus their attention on important information.

 

Lesson Plans

 

Lesson Plan: Questioning, The Mitten

 

This lesson is designed to introduce primary students to the importance of asking questions before, during, and after listening to a story. In this lesson, using the story The Mitten by Jan Brett, students learn how to become good readers by asking questions. This is the first lesson in a set of questioning lessons designed for primary grades.

 

Lesson Plan: Questioning, Grandfather’s Journey

 

This lesson is for intermediate students using the strategy with the book, Grandfather’s Journey, by Allen Say.

 

Lesson Plan: Questioning, Koko’s Kitten

 

This lesson is designed to establish primary students’ skills in asking questions before, during, and after they listen to a story. You can help students learn to become better readers by modeling how and when you ask questions while reading aloud the true story, Koko’s Kitten, by Dr. Francine Patterson. This is the second lesson in a set of questioning lessons designed for primary grades.

 

Lesson Plan: Asking Pre-Reading Questions

 

This is a language arts lesson for students in grades 3-5. Students will learn about asking questions before reading and will make predictions based on the discussion of the questions.

 

Lesson Plan: Asking Questions When Reading

 

In this lesson, the teacher will read The Wall by Eve Bunting with the purpose of focusing on asking important questions. The students and the teacher will then categorize the questions according to the criteria for each.

 



read more

Questions Before, During, and After Reading: Part 1 of 2


Mimi Rothschild
Wednesday, 14 November 2007 12:09

1 Comment

 

By Mimi Rothschild

There’s the old saying “the squeaky wheel gets the grease.”  The same sort of philosophy can be applied to asking questions while reading.  Homeschool students who ask questions before, during, and after reading will have a much higher level of comprehension than those students who don’t ask any questions at all.  Learn about how asking questions will improve your homeschooler’s level of reading comprehension in this article below.

What Is It?

 

To aid their comprehension, skillful readers ask themselves questions before, during, and after they read. You can help students become more proficient by modeling this process for them and encouraging them to use it when they read independently.

 

Why Is It Important?

 

Dolores Durkin’s research in 1979 showed that most teachers asked students questions after they had read, as opposed to questioning to improve comprehension before or while they read. In the late 1990s, further research (Pressley, et al. 1998) revealed that despite the abundance of research supporting questioning before, during, and after reading to help comprehension, teachers still favored post-reading comprehension questions.

 

Researchers have also found that when adult readers are asked to “think aloud” as they read, they employ a wide variety of comprehension strategies, including asking and answering questions before, during, and after reading (Pressley and Afflerbach 1995). Proficient adult readers:

  • Are aware of why they are reading the text
  • Preview and make predictions
  • Read selectively
  • Make connections and associations with the text based on what they already know
  • Refine predictions and expectations
  • Use context to identify unfamiliar words
  • Reread and make notes
  • Evaluate the quality of the text
  • Review important points in the text
  • Consider how the information might be used in the future

Successful reading is not simply the mechanical process of “decoding” text. Rather, it is a process of active inquiry. Good readers approach a text with questions and develop new questions as they read, for example:

 

“What is this story about?”
“What does the main character want?”
“Will she get it?” “If so, how?”

 

Even after reading, engaged readers still ask questions:

 

“What is the meaning of what I have read?”
“Why did the author end the paragraph (or chapter, or book) in this way?”
“What was the author’s purpose in writing this?”

 

Good authors anticipate the reader’s questions and plant questions in the reader’s mind (think of a title such as, Are You My Mother? by P.D. Eastman). In this way, reading becomes a collaboration between the reader and the author. The author’s job is to raise questions and then answer them – or provide several possible answers. Readers cooperate by asking the right questions, paying careful attention to the author’s answers, and asking questions of their own.

 

How Can You Make It Happen?

 

To help readers learn to ask questions before, during, and after reading, think aloud the next time you are reading a book, article, or set of directions. Write each question on a post-it note and stick it on the text you have the question about. You may be surprised at how many typically unspoken questions you ponder, ask, and answer as you read. You may wonder as you read or after you read at the author’s choice of title, at a vocabulary word, or about how you will use this information in the future.

 

You should begin to model these kinds of questions in the primary grades during read-aloud times, when you can say out loud what you are thinking and asking. Read a book or text to the class, and model your thinking and questioning. Emphasize that even though you are an adult reader, questions before, during, and after reading continue to help you gain an understanding of the text you are reading. Ask questions such as:

 

“What clues does the title give me about the story?”
“Is this a real or imaginary story?”
“Why am I reading this?”
“What do I already know about___?”
“What predictions can I make?”

 

Pre-select several stopping points within the text to ask and answer reading questions. Stopping points should not be so frequent that they hinder comprehension or fluid reading of a text. This is also an excellent time to model “repair strategies” to correct miscomprehension. Start reading the text, and ask yourself questions while reading:

 

“What do I understand from what I just read?”
“What is the main idea?”
“What picture is the author painting in my head?”
“Do I need to reread so that I understand?”

 

Then reread the text, asking the following questions when you are finished:

 

“Which of my predictions were right? What information from the text tells me that I am correct?”
“What were the main ideas?”
“What connections can I make to the text? How do I feel about it?”

 

Encourage students to ask their own questions after you have modeled this strategy, and write all their questions on chart paper. Students can be grouped to answer one another’s questions and generate new ones based on discussions. Be sure the focus is not on finding the correct answers, because many questions may be subjective, but on curiosity, wondering, and asking thoughtful questions.

 

After students become aware of the best times to ask questions during the reading process, be sure to ask them a variety of questions that:

  • Can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the text
  • Have answers that might be different for everyone
  • Have answers that can be found in the text
  • Clarify the author’s intent
  • Can help clarify meaning
  • Help them make inferences
  • Help them make predictions
  • Help them make connections to other texts or prior knowledge

As students begin to read text independently, you should continue to model the questioning process and encourage students to use it often. In the upper elementary and middle school grades, a framework for questions to ask before, during, and after reading can serve as a guide as students work with more challenging texts and begin to internalize comprehension strategies. You can use an overhead projector to jot notes on the framework as you “think aloud” while reading a text. As students become comfortable with the questioning strategy, they may use the guide independently while reading, with the goal of generating questions before, during, and after reading to increase comprehension.



read more